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Emma Thompson urges Aung San Suu Kyi to restore peace in Burma

Emma Thompson urges Aung San Suu Kyi to restore peace in Burma

US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Patrick Murphy is expected to travel to Myanmar in the coming days for discussions on the crisis, after summoning Myanmar's ambassador to express US concerns on Wednesday.

"The humanitarian situation is catastrophic", he said, noting that at the time of his briefing to the press last week, there were 125,000 Rohingya who had fled into Bangladesh. It's been characterized by many as ethnic cleansing.

On a visit to London where he met British Prime Minister Theresa May and foreign minister, Boris Johnson, he told a news conference: "I think it is a defining moment in many ways for this new, emerging democracy".

"I think nobody wants to see a return to military rule in (Myanmar), nobody wants to see a return of the generals", he said, adding that Nobel Peace Prize laureate Suu Kyi should use her moral capital to highlight the plight of the Rohingya. They need our strong support.

China and India might have commercial, economic and strategic interests in Myanmar besides New Delhi's general apathy and callousness towards Muslims but both Beijing and New Delhi must realise that by supporting Myanmar they would be doing injustice to a hapless community.

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Peters said Chinese interests were "starting to dominate the lives of New Zealanders and clearly our economic direction". Mr Yang said he was proud to call himself a New Zealander and contribute to his new country.

The Myanmar government "and State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi in particular, should condemn unequivocally all incitement to racial or religious hatred and combat social discrimination and hostilities against the Rohingya minority", said the resolution.

Activists say more than 100 villagers, women and children among them, have been killed by security forces.

"Violence in Myanmar has created a humanitarian catastrophe".

The Rohingya, described by the United Nations as among the world's most persecuted peoples, have faced heightened fears of attack since dozens were killed in communal violence in 2012.