Global

California wildfire victims sue utility PG&E alleging negligence

California wildfire victims sue utility PG&E alleging negligence

The flames all but obliterated the Northern California town of Paradise, population 27,000, and ravaged surrounding areas on Thursday. Stocks of California's two largest energy companies fell sharply on Monday, the Los Angeles Times reported, as investors anxious about where blame for the deadly fire will fall.

The bodies of some of the Camp Fire victims were found in burned-out wreckage of vehicles that were overrun by walls of fire as evacuees tried to flee, only to be trapped in deadly knots of traffic gridlock on Thursday night. "And I'm not going to burn, so you better hurry'".

Overnight, the Camp Fire had grown 5,000 acres to 135,000, even though diminished winds and rising humidity on Tuesday had allowed firefighting crews to set up containment lines.

Hughes is one of the 30-plus officers who lost their homes in the blaze but continued to report for duty to help locate missing people and victims, the Butte County Sheriff's Office said.

Psssttt! While you're here we need your help. I want to recover as many remains as we possibly can, as soon as we can. "I had an opportunity to go up there and take a look for myself". As of Monday night, almost half of the evacuation centers in Chico, Oroville and nearby towns were at capacity. When deputies arrived they say that the two men ran into a house on Quail Run Drive.

In a lawsuit filed this week, homeowners said a high voltage transmission line failed, producing the sparks that caused the fire. But it added that dry conditions and steep terrain will continue to pose a challenge.

"I'm not feeling almost the amount of wind and it's a little bit cooler this morning", he said on Tuesday.

In some neighborhoods, all but a few houses were completely destroyed.

He has requested portable morgue teams from the United States military, as well as a disaster mortuary crew, additional cadaver dogs and forensic anthropology units.

While families were literally running for their lives from wildfires that were burning people alive, particularly elderly people who were unable to flee, President Donald Trump threatened to cut off federal disaster funding to California.

Father confirms son, 22, was among Thousand Oaks shooting victims
According to TMZ , Long was posting to Instagram during the shooting, and investigators discovered the videos hours afterward. After the ceremony, she said she's most upset that the bloodshed is now affecting where she lives.

In the video, a bulldozer, which had been clearing vegetation to limit the spread of fire into an adjacent community, can be seen working while the winds blow smoke through the air and stoke brush fires in the background.

The so-called Camp Fire is on its way to being the most expensive in the history of the state.

The exact number of missing was unclear, but many friends and relatives of those living in the fire zone said they had not heard from loved ones. Tuesday, accusing the utility of negligence and blaming it for the fire.

How did Woolsey Fire start?

In recent years authorities in California have reported an increase in such large, explosive and swiftly spreading wildfires over a virtually year-round fire season.

Although the fire is now 35 percent contained, firefighters are still primarily focused on protecting life and structures, citing "extreme fire behavior" from the blaze that has drawn power from Santa Ana winds. The effort includes planes that scoop water from the ocean to drop on the flames - as a video posted to Twitter showed on Monday.

"This gives us the opportunity to construct our lines, so we can be ready for the fire and put it out", he said.

The Woolsey fire in the south has so far killed two people and damaged a number of beach resorts.

People who lost homes in the Northern California blaze sued Pacific Gas & Electric Co. on Tuesday, accusing the utility of negligence and blaming it for the fire.

Authorities searching through the blackened aftermath of California's deadliest wildfire have released the names of about 100 people who are still missing, including many in their 80s and 90s, and dozens more could still be unaccounted for.